Unwanted NHS equipment to travel to South Africa

Tuesday 17th April 2018 11:21 am
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The volunteers from Dartmouth, left to right: Alan Depledge, Marius the driver, Mike Freeman Spencer Wigley, Harry Franks, Natasha Branton and Trevor Branton

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Tons of unwanted NHS equipment is being transported to Africa to help and support disabled people overseas.

Harry Franks who is based in Dartmouth had organised the equipment to be loaded onto an empty container lorry for a special mission supported by the Rotary Club of Dartmouth.

The car park of the Young Farmers HQ in Cheriton Bishop was used to load tons of the unwanted equipment which will be transported to Africa. The team of volunteers loaded the van at the YFC car park while another team loaded the container lorry of the approximately 600 items.

These volunteers came from the Cheriton and Tedburn Young Farmers Club, Dartmouth Rotary and others who joined them to help load the container destined for Kwazula Natal in South Africa and rotary clubs out there which serve the hinterland where poverty is rife.

Sarah Piercy, the winner of the wheelchair London Marathon in 2000 came along to offer her support.

Harry who works with the Dartmouth Rotary is the South West Organiser for PhysioNet, a charity that helps disabled people overseas. The charity collects discarded mobility and disability equipment from all around the UK and sends it to around 30 countries across the globe, at the rate of about one 40ft container a month.

“It was a relief to see Marius trundle off in his truck to Bristol with a virtually full container of very varied equipment, very skill-fully packed by the assembled company” said Harry.

“It was a great combined effort by all, thank you very much and please can Rachel and Dartmouth Rotary president Mike Freeman pass on my thanks to their respective teams.

“A special thanks to Trevor for driving the van and Natasha for doing the tallying.”

The medical equipment being transported comes from sources across the South West which included seats, standing frames, wheeled commodes, support rails, crutches, and walking sticks.

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